30/03/2014

FAST FOOD FAST FASHION

The time of logo, the revival of 90's branding going viral is already over. Brands have to find new strategies to be the one that will get everyone's attention, the one that will be the talk of the town, the one that will be the most recognizable in only one look on the runway. It is always a battle of influence but the seasonal presentations are no longer enough. Writing the brand's name in large letters is obviously boring. You can forget your logo-esque Kenzo, HBA, Carven and other branding sweaters that are no longer part of the modernity though we are not going to get rid of our Kenzo because they are timeless basics. The time is running out and it is the time of fast fashion now in which every piece you buy every year seems to be only consumed/worn for one season. We don't believe the hype as we are just describing a phenomenon that is literally translated in luxury goods. Of course, there will always be room on your shelves for logo sweaters but now you also have to make room for your fast fashion sweaters, bags or any other types of good.

Fast fashion branding is a diversion of worldwide consumption products. Pop Art artists such as Andy Warhol did the same to talk about people's obsession with consumption. Not sure if fast fashion wants to bring out a criticism about people's behaviour. It is just a wink and the brands are just playing with the idea of representation. There is nothing serious behind all these fast luxury goods as fast fashion and luxury don't work together. And no need to mention that obviously these products will cost you a thing!

Marc Jacobs (a compulsive art purchaser and a diet coke addict) created a cashmere Coca-Cola motif sweater which is a current obsession for us. On the runway, it was Georgia May Jagger who wore it with a floral guipure long skirt and it was a viral moment which produced an emotion as we were smiling. This sweater embodies at the same time profane, trivial and luxury as the t-shirt version of it cost 995$. There is no deep thinking of buying its "high street" version as the Topshop Pepsi Cola sweater was much more affordable.







Jeremy Scott X Moschino was the "too much exploration of fast fashion" embodying the "much ado about nothing" collection. This McDonalds and junk food collection was out of control and didn't make us smile, it was just stupid! Honestly, we love cooking homemade burgers, eating french fries but we really don't love the idea of wearing it. We acknowledge Jeremy Scott did create a thing for his first Moschino collection that people won't forget, but that's all. The collection was a pretentious pastiche of Moschino's trademarks with a heavy fast fashion touch.




Anya Hindmarch took consumption products  as a starting inspiration to deliver a sophisticated luxury goods collection. You get the Pop Art inspiration in term of colours and graphic propositions. She used the accessories as an advertising medium. We love the Kellogg's ad bags with the Frosties Tiger and the cock from Cornflakes. The laundry ad bags are also one of our favourites. Hindmarch succeeded in capturing some emotions from childhood. There is also a Peter Pan attitude saying "life is too short to be boring" embodied in these accessories. Hindmarch did fast fashion without being too literal as this collection mixed fashion, art and pop culture. That's probaly what we expect and want to see from fast fashion goods.






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